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Gargoyles: Leader of the Pack

Stuck in jail, The Pack have been getting thoroughly bored of prison life. However, all of this is about to change when a mysterious man only known as Coyote breaks inside the prison and helps Wolf, Jackal, Hyena, and Dingo bail out -- Fox nobly decides to be a good citizen and sticks out her sentence.

Now that they've broken out of prison, Goliath and his clan are determined to throw them back into the slammer. But will Lexington, the one who feels most betrayed from The Pack, be able to keep a cool head . . . or will his own personal vengeance risk losing those he truly cares for?


Episode Info


Episode number: 2x1
Production Number: 017
Airdate: Monday September 04th, 1995

Director: Frank Paur
Writer: Steve Perry


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Guest Stars
Clancy BrownClancy Brown
voiced Wolf
Recurring
Cree SummerCree Summer
voiced Hyena
Recurring
Jim CummingsJim Cummings
voiced Dingo
Recurring
Laura San GiacomoLaura San Giacomo
voiced Fox
Recurring
Matt FrewerMatt Frewer
voiced Jackal
Recurring
Main Cast
Keith DavidKeith David
voiced Goliath
Salli RichardsonSalli Richardson
voiced Elisa Maza
Jonathan FrakesJonathan Frakes
voiced David Xanatos
Edward AsnerEdward Asner
voiced Hudson
Jeff BennettJeff Bennett
voiced Brooklyn / Owen Burnett
Bill FagerbakkeBill Fagerbakke
voiced Broadway
Thom Adcox-HernandezThom Adcox-Hernandez
voiced Lexington
Frank WelkerFrank Welker
voiced Bronx
Episode Notes
Fox was reading Sartre in her cell (see Analysis).

As of this episode, the opening scenes begin with a narration of Keith David's, as the voice of Goliath.



Episode Quotes
Coyote: I've appointed myself leader in Fox's absence.
Wolf: (laughs) Congratulations. You've just set the record for the shortest term in office.

Hyena: I love a man who brings me weapons.

Coyote: First, I thought you might like to slip into something more comfortable. You want to take out the gargoyles? So do I, and I know how to do it.
Wolf: So how do we find them? They're not exactly in the Yellow Pages.
Xanatos: We won't have to find them. They'll find us.

Goliath: We're here to see Xanatos.
Owen: Alas, Mr. Xanatos is not here. It isn't him you want, anyway. Your business, I believe, is with The Pack. As it happens, their social calendar shows them arriving at Pack Media Studios any time now. They're expecting you. Shouldn't you, be there?
Goliath: I'll speak to Xanatos later.
Owen: Sooner than you think, perhaps.

Brooklyn: Look, Lex, I know how you feel. You trusted them and they used you, nearly got you and Goliath killed. I feel the same way every time somebody mentions Demona. But you can't let it consume you. You need to remember what's really important: family, protecting our home.

Jackal: Nighty night. Don't let the bedbugs bite.

Xanatos: Revenge, as they say, is a sucker's game. Robots are nothing, Fox, my dear. I can build a dozen more like this one. True love is so much harder to come by.



Episode Goofs
After the Pack defeats Brooklyn, Lexington, and Bronx, while Jackal is saying "Don't let the bedbugs bite" Dingo's mustache is missing.



Cultural References
Fox: Because Nietzche's too butch and Kafka reminds me of your little friends over there.

Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche was a German philosopher, who became one of the most provoking and influential thinkers of the 19th century. He believed that due to the development of the modern secular world, the traditional values (represented by Christianity) had lost their power, which he translated to his infamous declaration, "God is dead". Nietzsche sustained that the purpose of human life is to encourage the great individual (whom he calls the Übermensch—"overman" or "superman"), a hero who would create meaning in the meaningless world. The purpose of this overman was to create new values and replace the traditional ones. However, many people came to think of Nietzsche's overman as some sort of hyper-butch monster, so maybe that's why Fox he was too butch...

Franz Kafka was a Jewish novelist and short-story writer, whose fiction foreshadowed the oppression and despair of the late 20th century. He is considered one of the most significant figures in modern world literature; the term "Kafkaesque" is usually associated with the grotesque, anxiety-producing social conditions. In Kafka's short story The Metamorphosis, the main character awakes one morning to find that he has been inexplicably transformed into a giant cockroach. This explains why Kafka reminds Fox of the roaches that Hyena was shooting rubber bands at.

Elisa: Bad news, I'm afraid. The Pack has escaped from Riker's Island.

Riker's Island lies in the middle of the East River, in Bowery Bay, between the Hunts Point Sewage treatment plant in the Bronx and La Guardia Airport in Queens. The island is named after a farmer Guisbert Rycken, who bought it in 1667. NY City purchased it some one hundred years ago but the first jails didn't open there until the early 1930s. Riker's Island included up to 10 separate penal facilities and goes under the official name of City of New York Correction Department or NYC DOC (New York City Department of Correction). An official count in April 1995, stated at the that 18,161 people were behind bars on the Riker's Island complex.



Analysis
 Fox reading Sartre

Fox was reading an anonymous book of Jean-Paul Sartre, a French philosopher, dramatist and novelist. In his early philosophical work, Being and Nothingness, Sartre distinguished between human beings and the non-human world, arguing that human existence is fundamentally characterize by nothingness and by individual freedom and responsibility. He then sustained that human beings have the tendency to fall into "bad faith," which means that they reject this individual freedom and refuse to accept responsibility for their actions, by thinking that those are determined by their circumstances or their own natures. To achieve an authentic human existence, Sartre argues that we must overcome the predisposition to bad faith, be conscious of our own absolute freedom, and assume responsibility for every of our actions.

The underlined sentence may contain the reason of why Fox reads Sartre: she, as a criminal, denied the responsibility of her acts, but now she accepts them and tries to redeem herself by saving the Guard's life from Hyena's claws and not escaping from prison (however we later find out that it was all a manufactured plot to grant her an early parole).



Warning: Gargoyles season 2 episode 1 guide may contain spoilers
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