Login or register  
TV

Jeeves and Wooster

Show Slang
"a dog's breakfast":
In episode 2 of series 1, Golf Tournament, Sir Cuthbert says that Bertie made a dog's breakfast of the golf tournament. "A dog's breakfast" means a mess.
 
"bally":
In episode 2 of series 1, Golf Tournament, Bertie uses this term as a mild expletive when he says "Well of all the bally nerve!" of Bobbie Wickham. "Bally" is a more polite way of swearing, much like saying "darn" or "gosh"; it is often used in place of either "bloody" or "damned".
 
"biff":
In episode 4 of series 1, The Hunger Strike, Aunt Dahlia threatens to biff Bertie if he doesn't stop saying "tut." "Biff" is slang for hit, or punch.
 
"blighter":
In episode 4 of series 1, The Hunger Strike, Tuppy refers to Angela as "a little blighter" when describing the argument he had with her to Bertie. A "blighter" is a contemptible person, or someone held in low regard, or, more mildly, someone who is persistently annoying.
 
"bob":
In episode 1, Jeeves' Arrival, the cabbie tells Bertie that the fare is three bob. "Bob" means shilling, and is always used in the singular. A pre-desmalization British pound consisted of 20 shillings, or 20 bob.
 
"dash it":
In episode 3 of series 1, The Gambling Event, Bertie uses this mild expletive, and Aunt Agatha is aghast at his language. "Dash it" is a milder form of saying "damn it". It can also be used as "dashed" (eg: the dashed thing won't work!), and again, would be a milder form of "damned".
 
"glad eye":
In episode 3 of series 1, The Gambling Event, Bertie claims that the elderly gentleman who won the "Mature Gentleman's Race" was "old enough to give Bingo's grandmother the glad eye." The "glad eye" is an amorous look, similar to making sheep's eyes, or giving someone a 'come-hither' look.
 
"moggies":
In episode 1, Jeeves' Arrival, Bertie notes that the Glossops are afraid of "moggies". A moggie is a cat.
 
"nobble":
In episode 3 of series 1, The Gambling Event, Bertie says that all the events that he bet on were "scratched, axed, or nobbled." "Nobble" is slang meaning "disabled", and comes from a contraction of "hobble" in the noun form; "an 'obbler", which turned into "a nobbler".
 
"oats":
In episode 4 of series 1, The Hunger Strike, Bertie suggests that Gussie should "refuse his oats at dinner." "Oats" is slang for any food or meal.
 
"pipped":
In episode 4 of series 1, The Hunger Strike, Bertie notes that Aunt Dahlia looks pipped. This is slang for angry or upset.
 
"posish":
In episode 1, Jeeves' Arrival, Bertie tells Honoria, "That's the posish." Bertie is always using short forms and abbreviations for words; "posish" is short for "position".
 
"ruddy":
In episode 5 of series 1, The Matchmaker, Gussie threatens to pull off Bertie's ruddy head. "Ruddy" is slang for "damned" and a milder form of the word that could be used more freely.
 
"rummy":
In episode 2 of series 1, Golf Tournament, Bertie says that he's just had "one of the rummiest phone calls in a life time of rummy phone calls." "Rummy" is British slang for odd, strange, or peculiar.
 
"tinkerty tonk":
In episode 5 of series 1, The Matchmaker, Bertie says this when leaving, and he says it angrily. It seems to be a slang way of saying 'Good-bye'.
 

Warning: Jeeves and Wooster guide may contain spoilers
Classification: Scripted
Genre: Comedy
Status: Canceled/Ended
Network: itv ( United Kingdom)
Airs: Sundays
Runtime: 60 Minutes
Premiere: April 22, 1990
Ended: June 20, 1993
There currently is no editor for this guide..
Click here to apply if you want to be the editor

Jeff Brazier Goes Backstage at 'The X Factor'

As The X Factor returns this weekend, This Morning’s Jeff Brazier was..

Netflix Renews Animated Comedy 'BoJack Horseman'

    Netflix is not wasting any time when it comes to its programming. Only..

Warner Bros. TV in Talks to Revive 'Full House'

  It has been almost twenty years since ‘Full House’ went off the air,..