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Wendy Wasserstein

Mostly Credited As: Wendy Wasserstein
Date Of Birth: October 15, 1950 (Age 55)
Country Of Birth: USA
Birth Place: Brooklyn, New York
Date Of Death: January 30, 2006
Cause Of Death: Cancer (New York, New York)

Wendy Wasserstein


Born October 18, 1950, Wasserstein, the youngest of four children, grew up first in Brooklyn in what she has called, "a nice, middle-class Jewish family," and later in Manhattan. Her father, Morris, was a textile executive. She attended Mount Holyoke College in Massachusetts and then went to Yale University where she became friends with such budding playwrights as Christopher Durang and Albert Innaurato and began her theater career. Wasserstein was first noticed with "Uncommon Women and Others," written as a Yale School of Drama graduate thesis. The one-act play was expanded and done off-Broadway in 1977 with Glenn Close, Jill Eikenberry and Swoosie Kurtz in the cast. A year later, this satire about the anxieties of female college graduates was filmed for public television with Meryl Streep replacing Close.

The playwright continued her off-Broadway success with "Isn't It Romantic" -- about a free spirit who rejects her fiance and tries to find a life as a single woman. In 1997, Broadway saw "An American Daughter," Wasserstein's story of the political downfall of a perfect career woman, played by Kate Nelligan. It was followed in 2000 by "Old Money," her look at money, manners and morals at the beginning and end of the 20th century, done at Lincoln Center's small Mitzi Newhouse Theater. Sonny Mehta, Chairman of the Knopf Publishing Group -- Wasserstein's publisher -- expressed sorrow in a joint statement with Wasserstein's editor at Knopf, Victoria Wilson. While primarily a playwright, Wasserstein also wrote for TV and the movies, most notably the screenplay for the 1998 film version of Stephen McCauley's novel, "The Object of My Affection," about a gay man and a pregnant woman who meet and move in together. Wasserstein was the author of the best-selling children's book, "Pamela's First Musical" (1996). She also wrote two collections of personal essays, "Bachelor Girls," published in 1990, and "Shiksa Goddess: Or, How I Spent My Forties" (2001). At age 48, Wasserstein had a daughter, Lucy Jane, born in 1999, three months prematurely. Despite persistent speculation, she always declined to reveal the identity of the girl's father.

Her most recent work, "Third," which ended a New York run December 18, 2005, dealt with a female college professor, played by Dianne Wiest, whose liberal, feminist convictions are put to the test by a student she sees as the epitome of the white male establishment. In public, Wasserstein was genial, often quite funny, presenting herself as a rumpled observer of the baby-boom generation. Many of her plays were initially seen at off-Broadway's Playwrights Horizons and later at Lincoln Center Theater, both under the direction of longtime mentor and friend, Andre Bishop.In "The Heidi Chronicles," which won the best-play Tony as well as the Pulitzer Prize for drama in 1989, its insecure heroine (played by Joan Allen) takes a 20-year journey beginning in the late 1960s and changes her attitudes about herself, men and other women. "The Sisters Rosensweig," which moved from Lincoln Center to Broadway in 1993, concerned three siblings who find strength in themselves and in each other. Her most recent work, "Third," which ended a New York run December 18, 2005, dealt with a female college professor, played by Dianne Wiest, whose liberal, feminist convictions are put to the test by a student she sees as the epitome of the white male establishment.

Wasserstein, who had been battling cancer in late 2005, and died January 30th 2006, at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Lincoln Center Theater spokesman Philip Rinaldi said. Andre Bishop, head of Lincoln Center Theater and a close friend of Wasserstein, said the cause of death was lymphoma. Her writing was known for its sharp, often wry observations about what women had to do to succeed in a world dominated by men.

TV Appearances

Episode Cast Credits 

The Rosie O'Donnell Show (1996) 
  Episode dated 5 June 2001 06x??: (Jun/05/2001) As Herself 

Frasier (1993) 
  Head Game 04x05: (Nov/12/1996) Voiced  Linda 

Where's Elvis This Week? (1996) 
  Episode #4 01x05: (Nov/03/1996) As Herself 

The Late Show with David Letterman (1993) 
  Joan Lunden, Ian Moore, Wendy Wasserstein 01x80: (Dec/27/1993) As Herself 
Crew Credits

Show Crew



Episode Crew


Trying Times (1987) (Credited in 1 episodes from this show) 
 
Drive, She Said 01x02 Oct/25/1987 As: Teleplay
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